National Geographic Adventure

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Posts tagged Everest

May 22
Going Up: Our climbing team—Conrad, Kris, Sam, Emily, Hilaree, and Mark—starts its ascent for the summit.
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Going Up: Our climbing team—Conrad, Kris, Sam, Emily, Hilaree, and Mark—starts its ascent for the summit.

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May 21
Everest 2012: Our Team Begins Climbing Into Thin Air

Everest 2012: Our Team Begins Climbing Into Thin Air


Mar 20
What to pack for Everest? Here’s a list from climber Hilaree O’Neill—gear, apparel, tech, food, more.

What to pack for Everest? Here’s a list from climber Hilaree O’Neill—gear, apparel, tech, food, more.


Mar 16
As seen from Lhotse, a team of climbers ascending Everest creates a spectacular line of light on the mountain ridge.  Today National Geographic announced its Spring 2012 Everest expedition with climbers Conrad Anker, Cory Richards, Hilaree O’Neill, Phil Henderson, Kris Erickson, Sam Elias, Emily Harrington, and more. Learn about the expeditionPhotograph by Cory Richards

As seen from Lhotse, a team of climbers ascending Everest creates a spectacular line of light on the mountain ridge.

Today National Geographic announced its Spring 2012 Everest expedition with climbers Conrad Anker, Cory Richards, Hilaree O’Neill, Phil Henderson, Kris Erickson, Sam Elias, Emily Harrington, and more.

Learn about the expedition

Photograph by Cory Richards


Nov 25

Adventurers of the Year 2012: Lakpa Tsheri Sherpa and Sano Babu Sunuwar

See photos of all the Adventurers of the Year!

When Lakpa Tsheri Sherpa first saw paragliders arrive in the Himalaya, he dreamed of flying above the massive peaks of his home—the Khumbu region. After his third successful summit guiding trip on Everest, he viewed paragliding as a simpler, faster, and more graceful way of descending through the peak’s perilous slopes.

In October of 2010, Lakpa borrowed a paraglider, got a few pointers, and launched from a hillside above his home. He promptly crashed into a tree. With his paraglider wing badly damaged, Lakpa set out for the town of Pokhara, considered to be the gathering spot for paragliders, to seek repairs and find a mentor. He ran into Sano Babu Sunuwar, whom Lakpa had met years earlier on Island Peak. Babu repaired the glider and the two men hatched the plan for the Ultimate Descent.

They would climb to the world’s highest point, launch a paraglider and fly for as long as possible, bicycle to a point where streams gathered into rivers, kayak across the Nepali border into India, and paddle the Ganges River all the way to the Indian Ocean. It would be an unprecedented first, but it was the overall combination of sports, audacity, and friendship that drew the duo to the idea. Babu, 28, had no climbing experience. Lakpa, 37, had never kayaked and didn’t even know how to swim.

In April of 2011, the duo had borrowed gear, slapped a basic plan together, and began their ascent of Everest. On May 21, they became the third party to launch a paraglider from the summit and set a new world record of 8,865 meters for free flight in the process. On the Kosi River’s Class V rapids, Babu got caught recirculating in a massive whirlpool in their two-man kayak, while Lakpa floated down river. Once they reached the Ganges, they paddled flatwater through unfamiliar country. They were robbed at knifepoint and had to live off fruit trees. After 850 kilometers, Lakpa and Babu reached the Bay of Bengal. On June 27, they became the first people to complete the descent from Everest’s summit to the Indian Ocean.

“When we arrived on the beach, we were frightened. We were surrounded by giant red scorpions,” says Babu. Later after showing pictures to friends, he would learn that these “scorpions” were in fact harmless crabs.

The Ultimate Descent team earned recognition from the international paragliding community, and the Nepali press hailed them as national heroes. Western adventurers admired their spunk, simplicity, and bare-bones budget. There were no social media campaigns, corporate sponsors, or expedition websites, just the essential ingredients for adventure—vision, creativity, and friendship.

—Fitz Cahall

Now read the interview with Lakpa and Babu and be sure to vote everyday for your favorite adventurer


Jul 12
Today’s Featured Hike: Lukla to Everest Base Camp
Round-Trip: 70 miles, 16 days
When to Go: Pre-monsoon (March or April) gives you the rhododendrons in bloom and lots of climber action, but post-monsoon (November) gives you drier weather. Go with guide services that use local Sherpa guides, cooks, and porters—it’s part of the experience.
Arguably the greatest of all high-mountain journeys, this stroll through Nepal’s Khumbu district lets you see three of the highest peaks on Earth (Everest, Lhotse, and Lhotse Sar) in one glance—and dozens more Himalayan giants along the way. A favorite is the view from Thyangboche, called by renowned mountain explorer W.H. Tillman the “greatest view in the world.” But it’s the deep immersion in the Sherpas’ Buddhist culture that will bring you back for the friendly villages, the monasteries, and the polyglot scene of world travelers who come for the high-octane pilgrimage to Everest.
Read more about this hike and see all our featured World’s Best Hikes»
Photograph by Alex Treadway, National Geographic

Today’s Featured Hike: Lukla to Everest Base Camp

Round-Trip: 70 miles, 16 days

When to Go: Pre-monsoon (March or April) gives you the rhododendrons in bloom and lots of climber action, but post-monsoon (November) gives you drier weather. Go with guide services that use local Sherpa guides, cooks, and porters—it’s part of the experience.

Arguably the greatest of all high-mountain journeys, this stroll through Nepal’s Khumbu district lets you see three of the highest peaks on Earth (Everest, Lhotse, and Lhotse Sar) in one glance—and dozens more Himalayan giants along the way. A favorite is the view from Thyangboche, called by renowned mountain explorer W.H. Tillman the “greatest view in the world.” But it’s the deep immersion in the Sherpas’ Buddhist culture that will bring you back for the friendly villages, the monasteries, and the polyglot scene of world travelers who come for the high-octane pilgrimage to Everest.

Read more about this hike and see all our featured World’s Best Hikes»

Photograph by Alex Treadway, National Geographic



Jun 24
A Scene From Everest Basecamp
A busy night in Basecamp as evidenced by trails of headlamps coursing through tents along the Khumbu Glacier. The West Shoulder, Khumbu Icefall, and Nuptse rise behind.
Photograph by Jake Norton

A Scene From Everest Basecamp

A busy night in Basecamp as evidenced by trails of headlamps coursing through tents along the Khumbu Glacier. The West Shoulder, Khumbu Icefall, and Nuptse rise behind.

Photograph by Jake Norton


May 24
Everest 2011: Standing on Top of the WorldClimber Dave Hahn on summitting of Everest for the 12th time last weekend: "Eventually we had the top to ourselves and enjoyed the quiet.  After  months of life in deep valleys or on steep mountain faces, it was a  welcome novelty to experience gigantic and open 360 degree views."Photograph by Dave Hahn
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Everest 2011: Standing on Top of the World

Climber Dave Hahn on summitting of Everest for the 12th time last weekend:

"Eventually we had the top to ourselves and enjoyed the quiet. After months of life in deep valleys or on steep mountain faces, it was a welcome novelty to experience gigantic and open 360 degree views."

Photograph by Dave Hahn

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May 19

82-Year-Old Dies in Attempt to Set New Age Record on Everest

Sad news from Everest Monday, as we have received word that 82-year-old Shailendra Kumar Upadhyaya died while trying to scale the mountain. He had hoped to set a new age record for reaching the summit and prove to the world that elderly people are still strong and vibrant, even after the age of 80.

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