National Geographic Adventure

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Posts tagged climbing

Feb 8
“This desire for freedom goes far beyond the highline to every facet of life. Freedom is our most fundamental right.” Pioneering Free Soloist Dean Potter

Jan 30
Two young alpinists, Hayden Kennedy and Jason Kruk, just stirred up the biggest climbing controversy of the last decade on Patagonia’s magnificent Cerro Torre. And now a bitter debate ensues. Should they have chopped down Italian Cesare Maestri’s historic bolts dating back to 1970?See the first images published from their climb and learn the complex history of the mountain’s first ascents in our comprehensive story.

Two young alpinists, Hayden Kennedy and Jason Kruk, just stirred up the biggest climbing controversy of the last decade on Patagonia’s magnificent Cerro Torre. And now a bitter debate ensues. Should they have chopped down Italian Cesare Maestri’s historic bolts dating back to 1970?

See the first images published from their climb and learn the complex history of the mountain’s first ascents in our comprehensive story.


Jan 17

Only two days left to vote for the People’s Choice Adventurer of the Year!


Nov 15
Adventurers of the Year 2012: Climber Cory Richards
After becoming the first American to successfully summit an 8,000-meter peak in winter, climber-photographer Cory Richards and his partners, veteran winter climbers Simone Moro of Italy and Denis Urubko of Kazakhstan, were hit by a massive wall of snow and ice churning down the flanks of Gasherbrum II in Pakistan. “Once the avalanche took us, there was no more fear,” says Richards, who documented the whole experience. “You’re dying. You are trying to swim in the snow, stay on top. All of a sudden we stopped and my face was on the surface.”Taking advantage of a two-day weather window, the three men had started up the peak with the knowledge that they would be descending in dangerous conditions. They climbed without the aid of supplemental oxygen or porters. They struggled through hurricane-force winds, minus 50ºF temperatures, and unstable snow conditions that led to the massive Class 4 avalanche. Moro was able to dig himself free and quickly helped his partners dig themselves out in a matter of minutes.Equipped with a small HD camera, Richards turned the camera on himself as he broke down, weeping with terror and relief. The raw, unfiltered images offer a rare glimpse into the perilous mental journeys that high-altitude climbers face.The footage became the backbone of Cold, a film that provides both a glimpse into one of the most inhospitable environments on the planet and an honest reflection on the risks of climbing the world’s biggest peaks. “Seeing someone that scared makes it real for the viewer. I can’t actually watch the film anymore. It’s a little too much,” says Richards. “I thought I was dying. It’s too harsh to put yourself through over and over again. It was very much the defining moment in my life. Period.”
—Fitz Cahall
Read the interview and be sure to vote everyday for your favorite adventurer

Adventurers of the Year 2012: Climber Cory Richards

After becoming the first American to successfully summit an 8,000-meter peak in winter, climber-photographer Cory Richards and his partners, veteran winter climbers Simone Moro of Italy and Denis Urubko of Kazakhstan, were hit by a massive wall of snow and ice churning down the flanks of Gasherbrum II in Pakistan. “Once the avalanche took us, there was no more fear,” says Richards, who documented the whole experience. “You’re dying. You are trying to swim in the snow, stay on top. All of a sudden we stopped and my face was on the surface.”

Taking advantage of a two-day weather window, the three men had started up the peak with the knowledge that they would be descending in dangerous conditions. They climbed without the aid of supplemental oxygen or porters. They struggled through hurricane-force winds, minus 50ºF temperatures, and unstable snow conditions that led to the massive Class 4 avalanche. Moro was able to dig himself free and quickly helped his partners dig themselves out in a matter of minutes.

Equipped with a small HD camera, Richards turned the camera on himself as he broke down, weeping with terror and relief. The raw, unfiltered images offer a rare glimpse into the perilous mental journeys that high-altitude climbers face.

The footage became the backbone of Cold, a film that provides both a glimpse into one of the most inhospitable environments on the planet and an honest reflection on the risks of climbing the world’s biggest peaks. “Seeing someone that scared makes it real for the viewer. I can’t actually watch the film anymore. It’s a little too much,” says Richards. “I thought I was dying. It’s too harsh to put yourself through over and over again. It was very much the defining moment in my life. Period.”

—Fitz Cahall

Read the interview and be sure to vote everyday for your favorite adventurer


Nov 6

Cold, the film about Cory Richards’s winter ascent of Gasherbrum II, won the grand prize at the Banff Mountain Film Festival this weekend.


Jul 6
Extreme Photo of the Week: Climbing Near Squamish, British Columbia, Canada
"Being  in this crack was surprisingly secure—when I was not moving," says  climbing guide John Furneaux of tackling Public Image, a 4-pitch route  on the North Wall of the Squamish Chief. "Whenever I tried to make  upward progress it felt like I might be spit out into the abyss at any  moment." The tight squeeze afforded amazing views of giant old-growth  cedar and douglas fir trees and Squamish, British Columbia, a gateway to  world-class climbing, whitewater paddling, wind sports, and mountain  biking. "As much as I hate to give away my secret playground," comments  Furneaux, "I have to say that if people are looking for adventure,  Squamish is truly the destination they should visit."Photograph by Paul Bride

Extreme Photo of the Week: Climbing Near Squamish, British Columbia, Canada

"Being in this crack was surprisingly secure—when I was not moving," says climbing guide John Furneaux of tackling Public Image, a 4-pitch route on the North Wall of the Squamish Chief. "Whenever I tried to make upward progress it felt like I might be spit out into the abyss at any moment." The tight squeeze afforded amazing views of giant old-growth cedar and douglas fir trees and Squamish, British Columbia, a gateway to world-class climbing, whitewater paddling, wind sports, and mountain biking. "As much as I hate to give away my secret playground," comments Furneaux, "I have to say that if people are looking for adventure, Squamish is truly the destination they should visit."

Photograph by Paul Bride


Jun 27

VIDEO: Rock Climbing in Chad

Last week we shared a photo from this incredible, all-star rock climbing expedition in Chad. Now watch the video.

These twisted towers and arches had never been climbed before—and watching the guys pull off first ascents, over and over again (Alex Honnold soloed five towers in a row), is amazing! The creative genius behind the edit is climber-artist Renan Ozturk, whose drawings and illustrations shape the visuals.

See more extreme adventure photos.


Jun 16
Celebrate Great Outdoors Month with a hike in the parks!
Today’s Featured Hike: Teton Crest Trail, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming
When to Go: Mid-July to Mid-September
Distance: 36.7 Miles, 6 Days
Level: Moderate Backpacking TripRead about this hike, see our trail maps, and get insider tips.Photograph by Raymond Gehman, National Geographic

Celebrate Great Outdoors Month with a hike in the parks!

Today’s Featured Hike: Teton Crest Trail, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

When to Go: Mid-July to Mid-September

Distance: 36.7 Miles, 6 Days

Level: Moderate Backpacking Trip

Read about this hike, see our trail maps, and get insider tips.


Photograph by Raymond Gehman, National Geographic


Jun 1
World’s Fastest Climber?
On April 17, 2011, Swiss climber Ueli Steck soloed the south face of Tibet’s 8,027-meter Shisha Pangma, the 14th highest mountain in the world, in a jaw-dropping ten-and-a-half hours. The news may have taken the adventure world by storm, but Shisha Pangma is, in fact, only one stage of a multi-mountain, six-month odyssey Steck has dubbed “Project: Himalaya.” 
Read more.

World’s Fastest Climber?

On April 17, 2011, Swiss climber Ueli Steck soloed the south face of Tibet’s 8,027-meter Shisha Pangma, the 14th highest mountain in the world, in a jaw-dropping ten-and-a-half hours. The news may have taken the adventure world by storm, but Shisha Pangma is, in fact, only one stage of a multi-mountain, six-month odyssey Steck has dubbed “Project: Himalaya.” 

Read more.